School of Architecture College of Design

READING FAÇADES: INTEGRATING HUMAN AND COMPUTER VISION

READING FACADES DAY 1 - 3.9.15

TODAY OUR INSTRUCTOR DID BATTLE WITH A ROBOT

 

Jentery Sayers, Assistant Professor, English and Social, Cultural, and Political Thought; Director, Maker Lab in the Humanities, University of Victoria lost the battle against Skalgubbar's decentralized photo storage and a robot from wordpress! However, Professor Sayers succeeded in teaching us about computer vision, markdown, and photogrammetry!

Today was a great introduction into the fascinating topic of computer vision. First, we discussed the representational applications of computer vision: pattern recognition, documentation, and analysis. The we touched on some of the speculative uses of computer vision to do a little dreaming about how the use and misuse of digital perception can help us to design and represent our world in new and fascinating ways!

 

Catalyst Instructor, Andrea Johnson, learning a new "language"

 

Dustin picking up a few tricks from Professor Jentery

 

Happy simply to have mastered a few simple commands in the terminal.

LINK

 

READING FACADES DAY 2 - 3.10.15

LEARNING PHOTOGRAMMETRY

Today, we experimented with the software Photoscan. The process entailed taking a series of photos of the exterior of Rapson Hall as a group then inputting the photos into the Photoscan software. The software, using a series of algorithms that identify common points within the images, interprets the photographs three-dimensionally. Results, in terms of wholeness and correctness of the actual forms, varied greatly throughout the class. We identified the methods that each of us employed in photographing the spaces, finding that more computer-like methods tended to yield results that more closely resembled the buildings as we perceive them. Below is an image of the east side of Rapson Hall as the computer perceived the photos I took.

IMAGE

The computer interpretations often have a warped appearance as it responds to several factors, including variations in lighting, coloring, transparency, and reflectivity. After reviewing findings, each student explored more specific material properties in the surrounding environment. Below illustrates computer interpretations of various architectural qualities.

TRANSPARENCY

IMAGE

REFLECTIVITY

IMAGE

MASONRY ENTRY

IMAGE

REPETITION

IMAGE

LOGGING

Using GitHub as an online file repository is equally fundamental this week. In the process of logging work and sharing data, markdown is used then pushed to GitHub through Terminal on Mac.

IMAGE

 

 

READING FACADES DAY 3 - 3.11.15

IMAGE

We continued playing with photoscan and discovered the effect movement and bodily placement had on the computer's interpretation.

IMAGE

Here we see how the computer interpreted the movement of the camera, the blue squares. The pictures were taken while walking in a straight line at the same height but the computer thinks the camera jumped while moving forward and then crouched.

IMAGE

We also looked at the effect of pre-processing the images. Here the hue saturation is blown out but it does little to the formal interpretation of the model.

IMAGEIMAGEIMAGE

We also wanted to explore what effect a bot (the drone) had on the computers interpretation (we were looking for any excuse to fly the drone).

 

 

READING FACADES DAY 4 - 3.12.15

 

This morning we worked to summarize our week long discussion, and to finalize the topics which we hoped to explore via Photoscan and the computer vision  

techniques we had learned throughout the week. Our final topics of pursuit are as follows:

 

  • Computer vision's understanding of spatial affordances
  • The act of traversals and a computer's understanding of four dimensional space
  • Computer vision's perceptive emphasis the spaces which compose the periphery of our experience 

 

Our groups spent the rest of the day photographing and stitching images together to create our final presentation materials.

Studying the affordances of the Civil Engineering Building's entryway and the computer's perception of these characteristics

 

 

A drone's eye view of campus was used to build a 3D model illustrating the differences between an aerial and ground traversal

 

Preparing a Photoscan mesh of a gargoyle for CNC routing to illustrate the literal representational applications of photogrammetric techniques

 

A plan view of a traversal route through the campus mall, illustrating photogrammetry's understanding of spatial significance within the context of time

 

 

 

SITE MAP
School of Architecture
145 Rapson Hall
89 Church Street
Minneapolis, MN 55455

612-624-7866
Fax: 612-624-5743

Email: archinfo@umn.edu

Contact Information

College of Design

Saint Paul Offices

32 McNeal Hall, 1985 Buford Ave, St. Paul, MN 55108

P: 612-626-9068 | F: 612-625-1922

[directions and maps]

Minneapolis Offices

101 Rapson Hall, 89 Church St SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455

P: 612-626-9068 | F: 612-625-7525

[directions and maps]

© Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer. Privacy Statement Current as of